Research Updates

Here at Bigger Better Brains we believe that through educating yourself, you can then educate and affect positive change in your community.

With all of the research in the field of neuromusical science, our BBB Research section serves as a content hub for you. We regularly share findings and break down the latest research to educate and inspire discussion. We hope you enjoy this page on our website and share BBB news with your colleagues, parents and students.

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  • Did you know there are many types of sharing? When you stop and think about it, there are many ways we can share a toy or food, but most of the time, as parents or educators, we would say something like “let’s just be nice and share.” There is a whole field of research known […]

  • If you were to look at a standard weekly timetable for a kindergarten class, you would hopefully see at least one music learning class. This might be a 40, 50 or 60-minute class which, for 20 x 5-year-olds, would require a great deal of detailed planning by the teacher to maintain quality learning and engagement […]

  • Working memory is our temporary storage unit for information. It is the folder we put our daily timetable in, what we need to take with us to work or school. It is emptied at the end of the day and very little of it is committed to our more permanent memory systems. What types of […]

  • Here is a great article to take along to your next staff meeting or use as a discussion point with other teachers in your school, particularly if it is a primary or elementary school. It is a good description of the current thinking and research into the way our ears are at the root of […]

  • To get control of our inhibitory control, preschoolers might first need to get a hold of the beat! This study looked at the different impacts of a rhythm based music program and a melody based music program on different aspects of the executive function of preschoolers. Anyone who has spent time with a preschooler would […]

  • What would the following behaviours look like in a preschooler? 1 – Inhibitory control: the aspect of inhibitory control that involves resisting temptations and not acting impulsively or prematurely – we would suggest wanting to snatch a toy from another child or jumping on to ask a question before the teacher finished delivering the instructions. […]

  • What is musical play? Is it bashing on an upturned drum in the playground or banging pots and pans on the kitchen floor? Well, it can be both. A different term to use might be musical exploration, the idea that young children get the opportunity to explore sounds. Most playground designs or outdoor spaces take […]

  • This is not new, but recent research helps us understand why it works. The abstract says “The primary musical features of infant-directed singing are ideal for emotional coordination and sharing between parent and infant without the risk of over-stimulation.” Check out our posters designed to get your students talking about the benefits of music! What […]

  • How efficiently is your brain working today? 🧠🎶🥁🎷🎹🎺🎸🎻😃 Music learning trains the brain to use less brain resources when compared with non musically trained people (and in this case those who are also bilingual). The cognitive function featured in this article is working memory, which is the part of our brain that is important for […]

  • Music and speech – two peas in a baby’s brain pod 🧠🎶👶🏼 In this study they found that 9 month old babies who had one month of exposure to directed music listening improved not only their auditory processing of music but also their language. So little time, so much benefit! 🧠🎶🗣 The questions is why […]

  • Music learning in early childhood increases pre-reading skills and vocabulary 🧠🎶📖 The results of this study of 90 3-6 years olds found that early childhood music training can lead to associated improvements in both musical skills and language skills, thus strengthening the evidence for a developmental link between these two abilities. The study also found […]

  • Musicians have been found to have higher capacity for something called speech-in-noise. This is the ability to hear and understand speech in a noisy environment. This is interesting to researchers because this ability is one of the most commonly reported effects of hearing loss and the one that often leads sufferers withdrawing from social situations […]

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