Research Updates

Here at Bigger Better Brains we believe that through educating yourself, you can then educate and affect positive change in your community.

With all of the research in the field of neuromusical science, our BBB Research section serves as a content hub for you. We regularly share findings and break down the latest research to educate and inspire discussion. We hope you enjoy this page on our website and share BBB news with your colleagues, parents and students.

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  • Here is a fascinating new theoretical paper about the relationship between rhythm and language abilities. A theoretical study is one that brings together all the relevant current research and puts forward a theory of, in this case, how two concepts may be connected. In the diagram below you will see the researchers have put forward […]

  • It has been widely publicised that the National Institute of Health (NIH) in the U.S. has just awarded the Sound Health Initiative $20 million over the next 5 years to look into the health and learning benefits of music and music learning. Read more about this in October’s member package! Firstly, this is an enormous […]

  • A woman is holding an electric guitar and making the rock-on symbol with her hand

    Music therapy and music learning are having a profound impact on the life and rehabilitation of people suffering from Parkinson’s disease. It is important to understand the difference between music therapy and music learning because sometimes they either look very similar, or one leads seamlessly into the other. Music therapy is a music based intervention […]

  • Baby plays pots & pans with wooden spoons

    What is the connection between rhythm and reading?👏📖 They use overlapping neural mechanisms and this brand new study with beginner readers (aged 5-7) found a whole swag of connections, concluding that “rhythm skills and literacy call on overlapping neural mechanisms, supporting the idea that rhythm training may boost literacy in part by engaging sensory‐motor systems”. […]

  • 10 minutes of music learning a week for 10 weeks can improve reading skills for poor readers. This amazing study is by the great Prof Susan Hallam and she tested a music intervention to assist poor readers. After a rhythmic intervention involving clapping, stamping, and chanting to music while following notation on a chart, the […]

  • A group of kids learn different instruments in music class

    This study is important because it is trying to get to the bottom of the neural development of the auditory and motor networks. It is, however, building on the research from musically trained children and reading. The study looked to test children before they had music learning or learned how to read. The researchers took […]

  • This study has compared musical training with the visual aspect of reading languages. The most interesting thing about the study design is that they have compared Chinese language reading and English language reading. The main visible difference between these two types of language reading is that English is read sequentially from left to right whereas […]

  • Participants in this study were older adults who engaged in a three month music or visual art program. “Our findings reveal a causal relationship between art training (music and visual art) and neuroplastic changes in sensory systems, with some of the neuroplastic changes being specific to the training regimen.” This means that music and arts […]

  • “A common argument against daily music education is that it takes time away from teaching fundamentals such as reading and math. But evidence shows that music training actually improves children’s reading and math skills, suggesting that it can pay dividends in more traditional academic domains” A great article from Dr Nina Kraus, one of the […]

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